Abstract
Mycoplasma Hominis Increases the Risk for Ureaplasma Parvum Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Pregnant Women
Nikita Nundlall*, Bongekile Ngobese, Ravesh Singh, Partson Tinarwo and Nathlee Abbai
Corresponding Author: Nikita Nundlall, School of Clinical Medicine laboratory, College of Health Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa.
Revised: November 28, 2023; Available Online: November 28, 2023
Citation: Nundlall N, Ngobese B, Singh R, Tinarwo P & Abbai N. (2023) Mycoplasma Hominis Increases the Risk for Ureaplasma Parvum Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infected Pregnant Women. J Infect Dis Res, 6(S4): 16.
Copyrights: ©2023 Nundlall N, Ngobese B, Singh R, Tinarwo P & Abbai N. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Background: Mycoplasma hominis and Ureaplasma parvum have been recently linked to sexually transmitted diseases and other conditions. There are a limited number of studies conducted in South African pregnant women which have assessed the prevalence and risk factors for genital mycoplasmas.

Methods: This study included 264 HIV infected pregnant women attending the King Edward VIII antenatal clinic in eThekwini, South Africa. DNA was extracted using the Pure Link Microbiome kit and pathogens were detected using the TaqMan Real-time PCR assays. The statistical data analysis was conducted in a freely available Statistical Computing Environment, R software, version 3.6.3 using the RStudio platform.

Results: The prevalence of M. hominis and U. parvum, was 215/264 (81.4%), and 203/264 (76.9%), respectively. In the M. hominis positive group, a significantly (p=0.004) higher proportion, 80.5% tested positive for U. parvum infection when compared to 61.2% among the M. hominis negative. Of the U. parvum positive women, a significantly (p=0.004) higher proportion of women (85.2%) tested positive for M. hominis when compared to 68.9% among the U. parvum negative. In the unadjusted and adjusted analysis, being M. hominis positive increased the risk for U. parvum by approximately 3 times more (p=0.014) and 4-fold (p=0.008), respectively.

Conclusion: This study showed a significant link between M. hominis and U. parvum infection. To date, there are a limited number of studies that have investigated M. hominis being a risk factor for U. parvum infection. Therefore, the data presented in the current study now fills in this gap in the literature.

Keywords: Mycoplasma hominis, Ureaplasma parvum, Human immunodeficiency virus