Review Article
COVID-19 and Well-Being
Sangeeta Kaul* and Jyotsna Joshi
Corresponding Author: Sangeeta Kaul, Ph.D. Research Scholar (Psychology) Barkatullah University, C-19/Phase-2 Galaxy City, Near Malhotra College, Amravad Khurd Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
Received: August 25, 2020; Revised: February 02, 2021; Accepted: December 30, 2020 Available Online: March 04, 2021
Citation: Kaul S & Joshi J. (2021) COVID-19 and Well-Being. J Psychiatry Psychol Res 5(2): 474-475.
Copyrights: ©2021 Kaul S & Joshi J. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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The present paper gives an overview of the studies related to COVID-19 pandemic and well-being. There is no proven treatment to manage the Novel corona virus disease till date. As the rate of spread is increasing day by day, in this context many person are undergoing mental stress and there is a strong need to consider their mental health status. In this context to keep the mental balance, improve well-being of the people. The present review thus describes and organizes importance of well-being in COVID-19 pandemic.

Keywords: Well-being, COVID-19, Pandemic
COVID-19

COVID-19 is a respiratory disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak of a new coronavirus disease, COVID-19, to be a Public Health Emergency of International Concern In January 2020 [1].
People can get COVID-19 from others who have the virus. The disease can spread from person to person through small droplets from the nose or mouth when a person with COVID-19 coughs, sneezes or speaks. People can catch COVID-19 if they breathe in these droplets from a person infected with the virus. These droplets can land on objects and surfaces around the person such as tables, doorknobs and handrails. People can become infected by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. The most common symptoms of COVID-19 are fever, dry cough and tiredness. Some patients may have pains and aches, nasal congestion, sore throat, runny nose, or diarrhoea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually. Some people become infected but they don’t develop any symptoms. People with cough, fever and difficulty in breathing should seek medical attention.

It’s effect on well-being

The COVID-19 pandemic is enormously stressful for all of us. India has declared COVID -19 outbreaks as a National Disaster. This pandemic has impacted the well-being of people or everyone. Hence, it is normal to experience a wide range of stressful reactions. Some may experience normal stress reactions like anxiety while others may experience extreme anxiety, depression, panic, of physical or mental health conditions [2].

Well-being

Subjective well-being is composed of life satisfaction, the presence of positive affect, and the absence of negative affect [3].
Well-being is the subjective feelings of contentment, happiness satisfaction with life’s experiences and one’s role in the world of work, sense of achievement, utility belongingness, and no distress dissatisfaction or worry etc. Well-being, well-ness or welfare is a general term for the condition of an individual or group, for example their social, economic, psychological, spiritual or medical state; a high level of well-being means in some sense the individual or group’s experience is positive, while low well-being is associated with negative happenings. In economics, the term is used for one or more quantitative measures intended to assess the quality of life of a group, for example, in the capabilities approach and the economics of happiness. As with the related cognate terms ‘wealth’ and ‘welfare’, economics sources often contrast the state with its opposite. The study of well-being is divided into subjective well-being and objective well-being.

Subjective well-being is based on the idea that how each person thinks and feels about his or her life is important “this idea is developed specifically in a person’s culture. People base their own well-being in relation to their environment and the lives of others around them. Well-being is also subject to how one feels other people in their environment perceive them, whether that positively or negatively.

Subjective well-being is based on the idea that how each person thinks and feels about his or her life is important “this idea is developed specifically in a person’s culture. People base their own well-being in relation to their environment and the lives of others around them. Well-being is also subject to how one feels other people in their environment perceive them, whether that positively or negatively.

How to improve well-being during COVID-19 pandemic

1. Keep your immune system strong

• Washing your hands with soap for 20 s, avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth.
• Maintain social distancing. Maintain at least 1 m (3 feet) distance between yourself and anyone who is coughing or sneezing.
• Eating well and staying hydrated, taking vitamins and getting enough sleep

2. Limit exposure of news

Restrict your COVID-19 related news watching/reading and listening many times in a day.

3. Seek information from reliable sources

Like WHO, Government of India or ICMR, challenge your fears and apprehensions with a reliable source of information.

4. Get fresh air
If circumstances allow, go outside for a brisk walk and fresh air, but avoid crowds and contact with others.

5. Exercise

This is not only good for your physical health, but your well-being too. Walking, stretching, jumping jacks, whatever works best for you to reduce or alleviate stress and increase endorphins.  Also can do such as meditation, pranayama, guided mindfulness relaxation, or deep breathing twice a day for 10-15 min at least. As positive mood will improve your immunity and keep you stress-free.

6. Stay connected with socially

• Stay connected with family, friends, and support systems
• Talk about your fears and concerns with person you trust.

7. Avoid using unhelpful coping strategies

Such as tobacco, alcohol, drugs.

8.
Parents should interact constructively with their children talk to them, give them information about COVID-19 based on their maturity level, increase communication with them.
 
9. Take care of older adults

It is essential as they are at higher risk for severe illness. Let them spend less time watching, listening or reading about corona outbreak, engage in interactive activities/games with them, make sure they take their medicines regularly.

10.
Indian Association of Clinical Psychologists (IACP) has taken the initiative

To form a COVID-19 psychological support group’ which aims to provide free telephonic/online counselling and Psychological first aid (PFA) to people in emotional distress to  help them to cope better in this situation [4].

CONCLUSION

It is typically assumed that a good mental health helps to cope up in stressful situation. Supportive and close family, friends and social relationships protect us from risky behavior like alcohol and other drug problems and also like anxiety, stress and depression. The author describe, the importance of well-being to cope up in this crisis.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to thank my research guide Dr. Jyotsna Joshi for her guidance and support in helping me complete this paper. I would also like to thank my family for their support and encouragement.
 
 
1. World Health Organization (WHO) (2020) COVID-19 Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) Global research and innovation forum. Available online at: https://www.who.int/publications/m/item/covid-19-public-health-emergency-of-international-concern-(pheic)-global-research-and-innovation-forum
2. World Health Organization (WHO) (2020) Mental health and psychosocial considerations during the COVID-19 outbreak. Available online at: https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/WHO-2019-nCoV-MentalHealth-2020.1
3. Diener E, Suh EM, Lucas R, Smith H (1999) Subjective Well-Being: Three Decades of Progress. Psychol Bull 125(2): 276-302.
4. Srivastava K, Bajaj MK, Maurya VP (2020) Indian Association of Clinical Psychologists (Registered as per Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860, Reg. No. 3694). Available online at: http://iacp.in/