Research Article
Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment: Impact on the Physicochemical and Thermal properties of Ascorbic Acid
Dahryn Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar Trivedi, Alice Branton, Gopal Nayak and Snehasis Jana*
Corresponding Author: Snehasis Jana, Trivedi Science Research Laboratory Pvt. Ltd., Thane, Maharashtra, India
Received: April 19, 2019; Accepted: June 07, 2019; Published: June 22, 2019;
Citation: Trivedi D, Trivedi MK, Branton A, Nayak G & Jana S. (2019) Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment: Impact on the Physicochemical and Thermal properties of Ascorbic Acid. Food Nutr Current Res, 2(2): 166-175.
Copyrights: ©2019 Trivedi D, Trivedi MK, Branton A, Nayak G & Jana S. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
 

Ascorbic acid is widely known for its role as an antioxidant and enzyme cofactor and it plays a dynamic role in maintaining good health. The study was performed on the test samples to determine the impact of the Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment (Trivedi Effect®) on the physicochemical and thermal properties of ascorbic acid using modern analytical techniques. In this experiment, the test sample was divided into two parts. One part was not given any treatment called the control sample, while the other part was received the Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment by a well-known Biofield Energy Healer, Dahryn Trivedi, known as the treated sample. The PXRD data of the treated sample revealed the significant alterations in the peak intensities and crystallite sizes ranging from -77.58% to 368.42% and -42.26% to 163.08%, respectively; however, the average crystallite size was increased by 5.18% compared with the control sample. The particle size distribution of the treated sample was increased by 12.67% (d10), 29.60% (d50), 18.29% (d90), and 22.35% {D(4,3)}, which causes 13.95% significant decrease in the specific surface area as compared to the control sample. The weight loss of the treated sample was 8.23% decreased, but the residue weight was significantly increased by 39.79% compared with the control sample. The melting temperature of the treated sample was slightly increased by 0.42%; while the decomposition temperature was decreased by 7.60%, compared to the control sample. Besides, the treated sample showed alterations in the latent heat of fusion and decomposition by 7.63% and -12.96%, respectively compared with the control sample. The results indicated that the Trivedi Effect®-Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment might form a novel polymorph of the ascorbic acid that might ensure better appearance, flowability and content uniformity during the product formulation along with improved thermal stability as compared to the untreated sample. Thus, the use of the Biofield Energy Treated ascorbic acid might be proved beneficial in the formulation of various nutraceutical/pharmaceutical preparations.

 

Keywords: Ascorbic acid, The Trivedi Effect®, Consciousness energy healing treatment, Particle size, PXRD, TGA/DTG, DSC

INTRODUCTION

Appropriate levels of nutrients are essential for proper The oxido-reduction reactions play a crucial role in the various metabolic and energetic exchanges taking in between the living organisms and their surrounding environment. The ascorbate is an important member of such reactions as it plays the role of an antioxidant and enzyme cofactor in this redox interrelationship. Ascorbic acid is mainly a reducing agent that acts as an antioxidant in various free radical-mediated oxidation processes. Besides, it may also increase the pro-oxidant chemistry of the redox-active metals such as iron and copper, by reducing them. Hence, ascorbate is known for its antioxidant activity as well as a pro-oxidant [1,2]. The role of ascorbic acid is also widely known in various hydroxylation reactions. The processes involve the formations of neurotransmitters and hormones in which there are various mono- and di-oxygenation reactions dependant on ascorbate. Also, ascorbic acid is needed in the hydroxylation of carnitine [3]. Moreover, ascorbic acid plays an essential role in humans due to its function in the redox homeostasis. There are two main forms of vitamin C in the diet, which are L-ascorbic acid and its oxidized form, dehydroascorbic acid (DHA). In humans, the vitamin C requirement  could  be  fulfilled  by  the  natural  sources  or through vitamin C supplements using these two forms in the ordinary diet [4]. The ascorbate could be given in supplement form due to various reasons as; it helps in solving the problems arising due to its deficiency or avitaminosis. Also, the reason for administration in the body may be its role as an antioxidant or pro-oxidant. The antioxidant property helps in treating those conditions whose pathogenesis involves the oxidative stress as the main cause, where ascorbic acid is frequently given along with other antioxidants in combination [5]. The ascorbic acid supplements, when used in combination with other antioxidants, can help in slowing down the advanced age-related macular degeneration progression as well as the loss of visual acuity [6,7]. The ascorbate supplementation may also help in some other health conditions such as, tuberculosis, febrile states, hypercholesterolemia, pneumonia infection, coronary heart disease, whooping cough, rheumatic fever, hypertension, angina pectoris, congestive cardiac failure, diphtheria, vascular disorders, diabetes mellitus, and sinusitis, and may improve the fracture, burns, and wound healing, etc. [8,9].

The efficacy and bioavailability of a drug depend upon its physicochemical and various other properties such as the particle size, crystalline properties, surface area and stability, etc. [10,11]. Therefore, various techniques were used by scientists to improve the physiochemical and thermal profile of drugs and thereby their efficacy and bioavailability within the body. One such approach that is widely known these days for its significant impact on the properties of a drug is the concept of the Biofield Energy Treatment. It is an emerging field that is used as an integrated healthcare approach under the Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies and provides beneficial effects against various health conditions [12,13]. National Institute of Health (NIH) also recommend such Energy Healing therapies under CAM category such as yoga, natural products, deep breathing, homeopathy, meditation, progressive relaxation, acupressure, hypnotherapy, acupuncture, healing touch, pilates, Ayurvedic medicine, Reiki, traditional Chinese herbs and medicines, etc. and these therapies are widely accepted by most of the USA population [14,15]. In a similar manner, the Biofield Energy Treatment (The Trivedi Effect®) has also been known worldwide as it poses a significant impact on the living organisms and non-living materials. The concept behind this treatment is that all human beings are infused with a subtle form of energy, which is called as the putative energy fields (Biofield) [16]. The Trivedi Effect®-Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment has widely affected the physicochemical and thermal properties of various pharmaceutical/nutraceutical compounds [17-19], altered the characteristics of microbes in microbiology [20-22], agriculture science [23,24], livestock [25], metals, ceramics and polymers [26,27], biotechnology [28] and skin health [29,30]. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the effect of the Trivedi Effect® on the physicochemical properties of ascorbic acid by using various analytical techniques.

METHODS AND MATERIALS

Chemicals and reagents

Ascorbic acid was purchased from Alfa Aesar, USA and the other chemicals used during the experiments were of analytical standard procured in India.

Consciousness energy healing treatment strategies

The test sample used in the experiment, i.e., ascorbic acid was first divided into two parts. The first part of the sample was not given any treatment and labelled as the control sample. On the other hand, the second part of the sample was known as the Biofield Energy Treated sample and received the Trivedi Effect®-Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment remotely under standard laboratory conditions for 3 min. This treatment was provided by the renowned Biofield Energy Healer, Dahryn Trivedi, USA, through the unique energy transmission process to the test sample. For the comparison, the control sample was treated by a “sham” healer as the “sham” healer did not have any knowledge about the Biofield Energy Treatment. Thereafter, both the samples of the ascorbic acid were kept in sealed conditions and characterized further using modern analytical techniques for determining the impact of the Biofield Energy Treatment on the sample in comparison to the untreated sample.

Characterization

The powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis of ascorbic acid powder sample was performed with the help of Rigaku MiniFlex-II Desktop X-ray diffractometer (Japan) [31,32]. The average size of crystallites was calculated from PXRD data using the Scherrer’s formula (1):

G = kλ/βcosθ                         (1)

Where G is the crystallite size in nm, k is the equipment constant, λ is the radiation wavelength, β is the full-width at half maximum and θ is the Bragg angle [33].

The particle size analysis (PSA) of ascorbic acid powder was performed using Malvern Mastersizer 2000 (UK) using the wet method [34,35]. Similarly, the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis of ascorbic acid was performed with the help of DSC Q200, TA instruments. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) thermograms of ascorbic acid were obtained with the help of TGA Q50 TA instruments [36].

All the experiment was performed three times in order to avoid any error during the experiment. The % change in peak intensity, crystallite size, specific surface area, particle size, latent heat, melting point, weight loss and the maximum thermal degradation temperature of the Biofield Energy Treated ascorbic acid was calculated compared with the control ascorbic acid using the following equation 2:

% change = [Treated — Control]/Control * 100                 (2)

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

Powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) analysis

The PXRD study showed the diffractograms of the control and treated samples (Figure 1) from which the further analysis was done by comparing the relative intensity and the crystallite sizes of the characteristic peaks (Table 1) of both the samples. There was the presence of sharp and intense peaks in the diffractograms of the control and treated samples, which indicated their crystalline nature. However, there were some alterations in the Bragg’s angles of the characteristic peaks of the treated sample as compared to the control sample that denoted the impact of the Biofield Energy Treatment on the crystalline properties of ascorbic acid.

The analysis of the peak intensities and crystallite sizes corresponding to the characteristic peaks of the treated sample showed some significant changes, as the relative intensities were altered ranging from -77.58% to 368.42%; while the crystallite sizes were changed ranging from -42.26% to 163.08%, in comparison to the control sample. The impact of the Biofield Energy Treatment was also visible on the average crystallite size, as it was increased by 5.18% in the treated sample (570.36 nm) as compared to the control sample (542.27 nm). The previous studies signify the impact of altered peak intensities and crystallite size on the crystalline properties of the sample in terms of changes in the crystal morphology that might indicate the formation of novel polymorph [37,38] of the treated ascorbic acid. Such techniques of changing the crystal properties and habit could be used in improving the efficacy and bioavailability of the compound [39]. Hence, it is presumed that the treated ascorbic acid sample might form a new polymorph that might show improved efficacy and bioavailability after the Biofield Energy Treatment compared to the untreated sample.

Particle size analysis (PSA)

The particle size analysis of both the samples helps in analysing the effect of the Biofield Energy Treatment on the particle size distribution of the ascorbic acid corresponding at d10, d50, d90 and D(4, 3) in comparison to the untreated sample (Table 2). The results indicated the particle size distributions of the treated sample were significantly increased by 12.67% (d10), 29.60% (d50), 18.29% (d90), and 22.35% {D(4, 3)} as compared to the control sample.

The resultant specific surface area of the treated sample (0.037 m2/g) was significantly reduced by 13.95% due to the increase in the particle size, as compared to the control sample (0.043 m2/g). Various scientific studies specified the effect of the particle size distribution of the formulation criteria of the drug such as its compactibility, blend uniformity and flowability, etc. Such properties further affect the efficacy, safety, stability, and quality control of the nutraceutical/pharmaceutical formulation [40,41]. The treated ascorbic acid sample might show better flowability, content uniformity, and compactibility after the Biofield Energy Treatment in comparison to the control sample.

Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)/differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTG)

The impact of heat on the stability profile of the control and treated ascorbic acid samples were analysed along with its degradation pattern by the TGA/DTG technique. The scientific literature reported the stability of ascorbic acid till ~200°C when heated and afterward the degradation started leaving the non-decomposed and carbonaceous residues of ascorbic acid in the form of residual mass [42]. The TGA analysis data of the control and treated samples (Figure 2) also indicated the stability of samples till 200°C as reported in scientific literature. The total weight loss of the treated ascorbic acid sample was decreased significantly by 8.23% during the thermal heating, as it was observed to be 76.04% as compared to the control sample (82.86%). The significant reduction in weight loss of the treated sample contributed to the remarkable increase in the residue amount by 39.79% after the thermal degradation (Table 3) in comparison to the control sample’s residue. Thus, it showed the increased thermal stability and reduced degradation of the treated sample compared to the control sample.

Moreover, the DTG data indicated the two peaks in the thermograms of both the samples (Figure 3) that denoted the temperature (Tmax) at which maximum thermal degradation has taken place. The treated sample’s thermogram showed Tmax at 220.09°C and 317.38°C for the 1st and 2nd peak, respectively in comparison to the Tmax of the control sample that was observed at 222.42°C and 314.07°C, respectively. Thus, the treated sample showed 1.05% decrease in the Tmax of the 1st peak, while the 2nd peak was increased by 1.05% as compared to the control sample. Hence, the study indicated the increased thermal stability of the treated sample at higher temperature range as compared to the control ascorbic acid sample. The overall TGA/DTG studies revealed the significant reduction in the thermal degradation of the treated sample that indicated the increased thermal stability of the ascorbic acid after the Biofield Energy Treatment.

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis

The DSC analysis helps in analysing the difference between the control and treated ascorbic acid sample in terms of their melting and decomposition temperatures along with the latent heat used during the process in the process of heating [43]. The scientific studies reported the presence of an endothermic peak (melting peak) at 193°C in the DSC thermogram of ascorbic acid when heated at the rate of 10°C/min. Moreover, an exothermic peak was also reported in the thermogram that is considered as the thermal decomposition of the ascorbic acid during its further heating that resulted in the release of the volatile compounds thereby forming the carbonaceous residue [42]. The DSC thermograms of the control and the treated samples (Figure 4) were observed similarly as mentioned in the previous studies. The further analysis reported that the treated sample showed the endothermic peak with minor increase in the melting temperature (0.42%), while the ΔHfusion was increased by 7.63% (Table 4) as compared to the control sample. Besides, the exothermic peak (decomposition temperature) of the treated sample was present at 215.14°C, which was decreased by 7.60% (~17°C) in comparison to the degradation temperature of the control sample. Also, the treated sample showed a reduction in the ΔHdecomposition by 12.96%, compared to the control ascorbic acid sample (Table 4).

Hence, the overall DSC data revealed the significant decrease in the decomposition temperature along with remarkable alterations in ΔHfusion and ΔHdecomposition of the treated sample after the Biofield Energy Treatment that might indicate some changes in the crystallization structure and molecular bonding [43] of the ascorbic acid in comparison to the control sample.

CONCLUSION

The study concluded the outcome of the Trivedi Effect®-Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment on the crystalline, physical and thermal properties of ascorbic acid in comparison to the untreated sample. The PXRD peak intensities of the treated sample and the corresponding crystallite sizes showed changes ranging from -77.58% to 368.42% and -42.26% to 163.08%, respectively as compared to the control sample. Besides, the treated sample showed an increase in the average crystallite size by 5.18% compared with the control ascorbic acid sample. Such significant changes in the treated sample might be attributed to the polymorphic transition of the ascorbic acid sample that may take place after the Biofield Energy Treatment in comparison to the untreated ascorbic acid sample. The new polymorph of the treated ascorbic acid might show better bioavailability and efficacy compared to the control sample. The particle size data indicated the significant changes in the particle size distribution of the treated sample corresponding to d10, d50, d90, and D(4,3) that were observed to be increased by 12.67%, 29.60%, 18.29% and 22.35%, respectively, compared to the control sample. The significant increase in the particle sizes of the treated ascorbic acid sample contributed to the decrease in the specific surface area by 13.95% compared with the control sample. Such alterations in the particle sizes of the treated sample might improve the appearance, flowability and content uniformity of ascorbic acid during the formulation development as compared to the untreated sample. The weight loss of the treated sample was 8.23% decreased, but the residue weight was significantly increased by 39.79% compared with the control sample. The melting temperature of the treated sample was slightly increased by 0.42%; while the decomposition temperature was decreased by 7.60%, compared to the control sample. Besides, the treated sample showed alterations in the ΔHfusion and ΔHdecomposition by 7.63% and -12.96%, respectively compared with the control sample. Hence, the thermal data of both the samples indicated that the thermal stability of the treated sample was increased, compared to the untreated ascorbic acid sample. Hence, the overall results on the Biofield Energy Treated ascorbic acid revealed the impact of the Trivedi Effect®-Consciousness Energy Healing Treatment on the physicochemical and thermal properties involving the crystalline properties, particle sizes, surface area, thermal degradation, and melting profile, etc. The Biofield Energy Treatment of the sample might form a new polymorph of the ascorbic acid that may show better appearance, flowability, content uniformity and efficacy along with improved thermal stability compared to the untreated sample. Thus, it could be concluded that the Biofield Energy Treated ascorbic acid could be used in the nutraceutical/pharmaceutical formulation for providing better prevention and treatment against various diseases such as scurvy, tuberculosis, common cold, febrile states, hypercholesterolemia, pneumonia infection, coronary heart disease, whooping cough, rheumatic fever, hypertension, angina pectoris, congestive cardiac failure, diphtheria, vascular disorders, diabetes mellitus and sinusitis, glaucoma, autoimmune diseases, bleeding gums, neurotic disturbances, and may improve the fracture, burns and wound healing, etc.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The authors are grateful to Central Leather Research Institute, SIPRA Lab. Ltd., Trivedi Science, Trivedi Global, Inc., Trivedi Testimonials, and Trivedi Master Wellness for their assistance and support during this work.

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